Florida Historical Markers Programs - Marker: Volusia





You are currently viewing Volusia

Volusia

SANDS FISH & OYSTER COMPANY
Location:100 Ocean Avenue
County: Volusia
City: Port Orange
Description: Side 1: The Sands Fish & Oyster Company supplied oysters to markets and restaurants up and down the Atlantic seaboard from 1916 until 1955. Founded by William Sands, Sr., the company earned Port Orange, Florida, the title of “Oyster Capital of the World” by harvesting fresh, delicious oysters known far and wide. In addition to oysters, the company supplied clams, fish, and shrimp. Sands managed oyster leases along the Halifax River as far south as New Smyrna Beach and as far north as St. Augustine. Before starting his company, he had worked as a bookkeeper for Daniel DuPont’s Port Orange Oyster Company. Originally located just north of Herbert Street along Halifax Drive, the Sands oyster house moved one block north to the corner of Ocean Avenue and Halifax Drive in the 1930s. In exchange for use of City of Port Orange property, the company provided the city with oyster shells for local roads. As the business grew, the oyster house expanded eastward over the river on pilings. Harvesting an average of 500 gallons of oysters per week, the company reached a high mark of 905 gallons during one week in 1943. Packed in gallon size metal cans, the oysters were shipped out by truck. Side 2: A mainstay of the Port Orange business community, the Sands Fish & Oyster Company provided numerous jobs. Workers traveled from New York and Georgia to work the eight-month oyster season. During the off season, workers replenished the oyster beds and fished the river. For each gallon of oysters shucked, workers received a token known as a “Sands Dollar” that could be turned in for pay or used in local stores. In 1947, William Sands, Sr., passed away and his wife Mabel Sands and her son William Sands, Jr., took over the company. Success of the oyster business continued, but the water quality of the river declined after the construction of the second Dunlawton Bridge in early 1951. The bridge’s earthen causeway design, known locally as the “Port Orange Dam,” restricted the water's tidal flow. Contaminants from septic tanks coupled with restricted flow raised bacterial levels in the river enough to end oyster harvesting. Sands Fish & Oyster remained in business selling fish, smoked mullet, clams, shrimp, and oysters that were supplied from other parts of the state. Mabel Sands sold the company to Fred and Martha Downing in 1956. The Downings continued the fish and shrimp market until 1961.
Sponsors: The Port Orange Historical Trust, City of Port Orange
THE CASEMENTS
Location:25 Riverside Drive
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: Side One: Built in 1913 by Reverend Dr. Harwood Huntington, The Casements is named for its casement-style windows. Retired Standard Oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, Sr. purchased it in 1918 as a winter residence, in hopes that it would support his desire to live to age 100. Known locally as “Neighbor John,” Rockefeller spent winters here enjoying golf, watching automobile racing on the beach, and meeting “Birthplace of Speed” race drivers. He also spent time socializing at the Hotel Ormond, and welcoming the company of friends such as Will Rogers, Harvey Firestone, Thomas Edison, and Henry Ford. Rockefeller died in his bedroom here in May 1937, just short of his 98th birthday. Allegedly his heirs intended to have The Casements razed following his death. Instead it was sold in 1940 to Maud Van Woy, owner and headmistress of the Fairmont Junior College of Washington, D.C. Van Woy transformed the building into the Casements Junior College. Following the closing of the college in 1951, The Casements then served as a religious retirement facility and school. Later it became Casements Manor, a secular retirement facility and transient hotel, and finally, the Ormond Hotel-Casements. Side Two: The property, which included a separate cottage called “South House,” was expanded through the years by each owner’s addition of staff residences, garage apartments, and dormitories. It fell into an extended period of owner neglect and was finally abandoned. Again destined to be razed in the late 1960s, The Casements was saved by local citizens. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, and the City of Ormond Beach purchased the property in 1974. It was restored with a federal Economic Development Administration grant under the Local Public Works Act in 1978 and reopened in 1979 as The Community Enrichment Center of Ormond Beach, a historical, educational and cultural facility also hosting community events. With the additions removed, The Casements evokes the residence built by Rev. Dr. Huntington and purchased by John D. Rockefeller. The State of Florida designated John D. Rockefeller “A Great Floridian” in November 2000.
Sponsors: The Casements Guild of Ormond Beach, The Friends of the Casements
BATTLE OF DUNLAWTON PLANTATION
Location:950 Old Sugar Mill Road, Sugar Mill Botanical Gardens
County: Volusia
City: Port Orange
Description: During the First Seminole War, 1836, the Mosquito Roarers, a company of Florida militia under Major Benjamin Putnam, engaged a large band of Seminoles pillaging Dunlawton, a sugar plantation on the Halifax River. Heavy fighting ensued, but the militiamen were unable to disperse the Indians. The extensive system of sugar plantations on Florida's east coast was eventually destroyed by Seminole raids and the sugar industry in this area never recovered.
CORONADO BEACH HOUSE
Location:1705 S. Atlantic Ave.
County: Volusia
City: New Smyrna Beach
Description: Coronado Beach was settled by Foster G. Austin in 1885. Austin built a series of beachside cottages approximately one mile south of Flagler Avenue. In its early days, Coronado Beach, named after Austin’s native community in California, served primarily as a retreat for hunting and fishing during the winter. The community center shifted north to the Flagler Avenue area after the construction of a bridge that connected the mainland and the beachfront. Not many of the original houses withstood the ensuing decades of beachfront development. This house is one of the original houses built in Coronado Beach by Austin and is an excellent example of the type of housing built in this area in the late 19th century. Its original location was one half block south, at the northeast corner of Hill Street and 8th Avenue. Notable architectural features of this frame Vernacular house include the cross gable roof, veranda with cut-out stars in the brackets, chamfered posts, alternate shingle siding and ornate attic light in the east gable end. Coronado Beach was incorporated into the City of New Smyrna Beach in 1946.
Sponsors: MALIBU CONDOMINIUMS, LLC AND THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE
DeBARY HALL / FLORIDA FEDERATION OF ART, INC.
Location:210 Sunrise Boulevard at DeBary Hall
County: Volusia
City: DeBary
Description: Side 1: Built in 1871 by Baron Frederick de Bary. Born 1815 in Germany of Belgian descent, de Bary came to New York in 1840 as agent for Mumm's Champagne. His estate of many hundred acres here in Florida was a hunting and fishing preserve and his family's winter home, where many notables of the day were entertained. Presidents Grant and Cleveland and members of Europe's royalty were guests. He died in 1898 in his 84th year, and his son Adolphe inherited the property. De Bary's residence here was during the steamboat era of the St. Johns River, and his interests included ownership of a steamship line. Side 2: Organized 1927 in Orlando for the purpose of promoting, developing, and advancing art in the State of Florida. DeBary Hall, with about five acres of land, was given to the Federation in 1959 by the Property Owners Association of Plantation Estates and became the Federation's State Headquarters and Art Galleries. In 1967 the property was acquired by the Florida Board of Parks and Historic Memorials, which then leased it to the Federation for its continued use. The Federation Committee that negotiated this sale and lease was Mrs. G.J. Brooks, Chairman; Mrs. Willard Bielby, Secretary; Dr. and Mrs. A.E. Brandt; Mr. William Daniell; and Mrs. Mabel Bullis.
Sponsors: Florida Board of Parks and Historic Memorials
DUMMETT PLANTATION
Location:At Addison Block House Ruins near Tomoka State Park
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: Near this site on the Tomoka River, stood "Carrikfergus Plantation", settle by Thomas H. Dummett, a native of Barbados, B.W.I., in 1825. The Dummett holdings were extensively planted in sugar and contained a sugar mill and large rum distillery. Worked by slaves, "Carrikfergus" and other plantations were destroyed in 1836 by Indians during the Seminole War. This disaster permanently destroyed the plantation economy of thisarea.
FREEMANVILLE SETTLEMENT
Location:S. Ridgewood Ave. between 4th Ave. and Murray Way
County: Volusia
City: Port Orange
Description: Founded soon after the U.S. Civil War, the settlement that would become “Freemanville” was established by Dr. John Milton Hawks, an abolitionist and Union Army surgeon, along with other Union Army officers and the Florida Land & Lumber Company. In 1866, roughly 500 former slaves, many of whom had fought for the Union during the war, and their families initially settled here. An additional 1,000 freed slaves would arrive via steamboats in the following months. Of the 3,000 blacks that made Florida their home, roughly half settled near the Halifax River, thus making this area the most populous in Volusia County at that time. In 1867, Dr. Hawks named the settlement Port Orange. Due to harsh farming conditions and poor supplies, the settlement, the Florida Land & Lumber Company, and the integrated school, disbanded in 1869. Many of the settlers returned to their home states or headed for area citrus groves looking for work. However, a few of those original freed slaves stayed. Over time, the settlement became known as “Freemanville.” Mt. Moriah Baptist Church is the last remaining structure from the pioneering African-American community in Port Orange known simply as Freemanville.
Sponsors: THE CITY OF PORT ORANGE AND THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE
GAMBLE PLACE
Location:1819 Taylor Road (off S.R.431)
County: Volusia
City: Port Orange
Description: In 1898, James N. Gamble, of the Procter and Gamble Company and a longtime winter resident of Daytona Beach, bought this land on Spruce Creek for use as a rural retreat. In 1907, he built a small cracker cottage with an open front porch and a breezeway connecting a separate kitchen and dining room, which he named "Egwanulti," a Native American word meaning "by the water." At the same time, he rebuilt an existing packing house to process citrus from his grove. In 1938, Gamble's son-in-law, Alfred K. Nippert, completed the "Snow White House," a Black Forest style cottage inspired by the Disney animated film classic Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The house is surrounded by a Witch's Hut, the Dwarfs' Mine Shaft, and an elaborate network of rock gardens. Collectively, these buildings and grounds form a historic landscape now known as Gamble Place. This property was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.
Sponsors: The Museum of Arts and Sciences of Daytona Beach and The Nature Conservancy in Cooperation with the Florida Department of State
HOTEL ORMOND
Location:S.R. 40 (Granada Boulevard). Near John Anderson Dr.
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: Hotel Ormond, named for Volusia County pioneer James Ormond, was built in 1887 by John Anderson and Joseph Price. The large frame building was bought and enlarged by Henry M. Flagler in the 1890's. Operated by Flagler's Florida East Coast Railway, it was one of the first Flagler hotels in Florida. After 1890, the hotel and adjoining Ormond Beach Golf Club became major Florida tourist centers. John D. Rockefeller, a nearby resident, was a patron of both.
NOCOROCO
Location:At Tomoka State Park.
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: On this site was the Timucuan Indian Village of Nocoroco. It was mentioned in the report of Alvaro Mexia's expedition down the Florida east coast in 1605. It was the first Indian village south of St. Augustine noted by Mexia. The site was used during the British Occupation of Florida (1763-83), and probably remained under cultivation until the Seminole wars (1835-42).
OLD KING'S ROAD
Location:Ormond Lakes Blvd. between Emerald Oaks Ln. and Lakebluff Dr.
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: The King's Road (also called Old King's Road named for King George of England) crossed north to south near this site. It was the first graded road built in Florida. Approximately 1.14 miles extends through Ormond Lake’s subdivision. Centuries ago, it originated as an Indian trail connecting Timucuan Indian villages along Florida’s East Coast. The Spanish laid out the primary trail during their first occupation of Florida (1513-1763). The British developed the winding trail into a working road (1763-1773) as area residents and the British Parliament put up funds for the highway’s construction. Among other uses during the British Period (1763-1783), it served the many large plantations being created along Florida’s East Coast. During the Second Spanish occupation (1784-1821) the Spanish regained control but preferred water routes to land passages and the King’s Road fell into disrepair. Following the American acquisition of Florida in 1821, the United States Congress appropriated funds to reconstruct the road. U.S. Army engineers completed the work between 1828 and 1831. The King’s Road was constructed from St. Mary’s, Georgia, to New Smyrna Beach, Florida, where it terminates at the remains of a stone wharf.
Sponsors: Ormond Lakes, Ltd., The Ormond Lakes Homeowners Association and the Florida Department of State
ORMOND TOMB
Location:North of Tomoka State Park on S.R. 5A (Old Dixie H
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: Near this site lies the tomb of James Ormond II. Ormond and his father, a Scot who immigrated to Florida via the Bahamas about 1804, made "Damietta," the family plantation, one of the most productive in the Halifax region. When Florida became a U.S. territory, Ormond became prominent in civil affairs, and during the Seminole War of 1836, commanded a platoon of the "Mosquito Roarers" at the Battle of Dunlawton. Ormond Beach was named for his family.
ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL
Location:U.S. Highway 1 at Ridgewood Avenue
County: Volusia
City: Daytona Beach
Description: The Florida frontier remained relatively empty until after the Civil War. during the late 1860s, both northerners and native southerners perceived great potential in Florida. Among the places they settled was Tomoka, which became Daytona in 1871. Daytona settlers remained unchurched until various Protestant denominations established the Mission circuits so typical of frontier America. One early mission was St. Mark's begun in 1877. The parishioners of St. Mark's early felt the need for permanence and began planning a church building in the late seventies. Their efforts were crowned with success with the completion of St. Mary's, a Gothic Revival structure with board-and-batten exterior sheathing. St. Mary's has remained on its original site, growing with the community it serves. The structure has been enlarged several times to accommodate the expanding parish; however, the original St. Mary's remains the core of the present building, a visible reminder of Daytona's earliest years.
Sponsors: sponsored by jay adams and associates in cooperation with department of state
THE ORMOND GARAGE
Location:S.R. 40 (East Granada Boulevard).
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: Built by Flagler's East Coast Hotel Company in 1903 for the 1904 races. This landmark in the history of the American automobile industry was the setting for the preparation, testing and servicing of some of the most famous racing cars of the world which made racing history and records on the nearby beach. It was a proving ground for pioneer automobile manufacturers such as Olds, Winton, Ford and Chevrolet. Some of the famous drivers who made world speed records here were William K. Vanderbilt, Jr., Arthur MacDonald, Fred Marriott, Ralph DePalma, Barney Oldfield and Tommy Milton.
Sponsors: The Birthplace of Speed Association, Inc. in Cooperation with Florida Board of Parks and Historic Memorials
SAUL'S HOUSE SITE
Location:880 Osteen Cemetery Rd, Osteen Cemetery
County: Volusia
City: Deltona
Description: Central Florida opened to settlers at the end of the 2nd Seminole War. The creation of Mosquito (later Volusia) County in 1843 signified rising interest in the area. George and Adaline Sauls were among those who came to Volusia County in the 1850s. Sauls built a two-room home near the road from Enterprise to the east coast in an area which became known as Saulsville. He added a second floor and other rooms as his family increased. After the 1880s, population centered on the railroad town of Osteen. Sauls family members remained in their home until the early 20th century. The Sauls house stood for over 100 years until fire destroyed it in 1972.
Sponsors: SPONSORED BY THE VOLUSIA COUNTY PRESERVATION BOARD
OLD ST. RITA COLORED MISSION CHURCH
Location:314 North Duss Street
County: Volusia
City: New Smyrna Beach
Description: The old St. Rita's Catholic Church Mission Building is one of the oldest surviving church buildings in the city. It was built in 1899 as the Sacred Heart Catholic Church of New Smyrna Beach, moved to this site in 1956 to serve the colored Catholics in the Westside Community, and was named St. Rita's Colored Mission Church. The building represents an important architectural landmark. The distinctive belfry, wood shingles in the gable end and pointed arch molding on the windows represent important architectural characteristics. After integration in 1969, the Diocese of Orlando converted the church into a neighborhood clinic and day care facility. The former church served that function until 1980, when the city condemned it in 1991. A committee of citizens, organized by Father Rudi Cleare of the Orlando Diocese, supported by Mark Rokowski, city planner and chaired by Mary Harrell, a retired educator and founder of the Black Heritage Festival, received state grants in 1997-98. These grants, coupled with private donations, funded the restorations, completed in 1999. The Orlando Diocese deeded the building and grounds to the Black Heritage Festival in 1999. The building currently serves as the Black Heritage Museum
Sponsors: Black Heritage Festival of New Smyrna, Inc. and the Florida Department of State
THE THREE CHIMNEYS
Location:715 West Granada Blvd.
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: The Three Chimneys, originally known as the Swamp Settlement, was a British period sugar plantation established c. 1768 on a portion of 20,000 acres granted by King George III in 1764 to Richard Oswald (1700-1784), a wealthy and influential Scottish merchant. The Swamp Settlement covered 300 acres. This site was the first successful and the oldest British sugar plantation of its kind in North America. The sugar making facility consisted of a long brick structure containing four separate furnaces feeding two chimneys which disappeared long ago. These ruins were restored in 2007. The run distillery had two furnaces feeding one chimney which stood until 1997. Mr. Richard Oswald went on to serve as the British representative for the Treaty of Paris in 1783 which ended the Revolutionary War. He helped obtain treaty terms favorable to the United States of America, including the establishment of the Mississippi River as its western boundary.
Sponsors: Sponsored by the Ormond Beach Historical Society, Inc. and the Florida Department of State
FLORIDA UNITED METHODIST CHILDREN'S HOME
Location:51 Main Street
County: Volusia
City: Deltona
Description: The Florida United Methodist Children’s Home was established here in 1908 as the Florida Methodist Orphanage. Children come from situations of abuse, neglect, broken and dysfunctional families, abandonment and other troubling circumstances. This institution began with the acquisition of one building, eight town lots and a tract of 40 acres of land purchased for $1,250. Articles of Incorporation were filed with the State of Florida on June 3, 1908. In 1939 the name was changed to The Florida Methodist Children’s Home, and renamed The Florida United Methodist Children’s Home in 1971. The site features three buildings—Brinkley Hall, built in 1923, Hardin Hall, 1926-27 and Randall Hall, built in 1933. Hardin Hall, the campus centerpiece, was renovated in 1980 and 1998. For a century the Florida United Methodist Children’s Home has operated to care for children in need
Sponsors: SPONSORED BY THE FLORIDA UNITED METHODIST CHILDREN’S HOME AND THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE
ORMOND FIRE HOUSE
Location:160 East Granada Boulevard
County: Volusia
City: Ormond Beach
Description: The Ormond Fire House, the only Works Progress Administration (WPA) structure in Ormond Beach, was built in 1937. The eclectically-designed two-story building features elements of Mission and Spanish Colonial Revival style architecture and is constructed of brick with a coquina veneer. It was designed by Alan J. MacDonough whose WPA projects include the Holly Hill City Hall and the Daytona Beach Bandshell and Armory. McDonough also designed the Peabody Auditorium and the Streamline Hotel in Daytona Beach, where the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) was founded. Construction of the Ormond Fire House began in 1935 using 52 local workers. It was used continuously as a firehouse and police station until 2006. The building was also used as a polling station, City Court, and a hurricane shelter. A wooden Civil Defense aircraft warning tower stood behind the building during World War II, as well as a city water tower from 1947-1971. The Ormond Fire House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a City of Ormond Beach Historic Landmark.
Sponsors: x
GREEN MOUND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE
Location:4400 Block of South Peninsula Drive
County: Volusia
City: Ponce Inlet
Description: The Green Mound is one of the best preserved and last remaining shell mounds in the region. The site holds a rich history of the prehistoric Florida Indians who inhabited the site for hundreds of years. Archaeological studies of the mound date artifacts to the St. Johns period (500 BC - 1565 AD). Mounds like this typically contain discards from daily life such as bones, shells, pottery, and tools. Archaeological studies of the mound show that people during the St. Johns I period (500 BC - 800 AD) occupied the site year round, while in the St. Johns II period (800 AD -1565 AD) people may have occupied the site seasonally. A botanical survey of Green Mound by John K. Small in 1922 revealed a unique botanical environment that included several rare plant species. Some of the plant species he noted are still visible in the area surrounding the mound, including wild-coffee, marlberry and snowberry. By 1933, a significant portion of the mound had been mined for shells used in road construction. In 1948, the Green Mound Historical Society, led by R.J. Longstreet, recognized the significance of the mound. The organization purchased it for preservation and turned it over to the Florida State Board of Forestry.
Sponsors: The Town of Ponce Inlet
THE GABORDY CANAL
Location:South Riverside Drive
County: Volusia
City: New Smyrna Beach
Description: The Gabordy Canal, also known as the South Canal, was built by colonists brought to the New Smyrna area in 1768 by the Scottish physician, Dr. Andrew Turnbull. As part of the largest single attempt at British colonization, New Smyrna attracted more than 1,400 Minorcans, Corsicans, Greeks, and Italians who sought new opportunities as indentured servants. Turnbull, impressed by the Egyptian canal system, wanted to replicate it in New Smyrna. Three canals, including this one, ran east-west and were linked with a fourth, longer canal that ran north-south. These hand dug canals provided irrigation and drainage for rice, hemp, cotton, and indigo crops grown by the colonists, and served as a mode of transportation within the colony. Local historians believe that the Gabordy Canal was named after the Gabardis, an original colonist family who lived in the vicinity of the canal. After nine years of harsh treatment, drought, and crop failures, the population was reduced to about 600 people. A group of colonists petitioned English Governor James Grant of St. Augustine in 1777 for release from their indenture. The governor granted land north of St. Augustine to these colonists.
Sponsors: City of New Smyrna Beach, Historic New Smyrna Beach Preservation Commission, Mayor James Hathaway, Vice Mayor Judy Reiker, Commissioner Jake Sachs, Commissioner Jason McGuirk, Commissioner Kirk Jones
ORANGE CITY COLORED SCHOOL
Location:200 East Blue Springs Avenue
County: Volusia
City: Orange City
Description: Side One: The Orange City Colored School was the first building in town constructed for the education of African Americans. Before it opened in 1927, various buildings had been adapted for use as classrooms but were small and poorly lighted. Inspired by her progressive values and the needs of the growing black population, Dr. Frances Dickenson donated five acres of land for the school. Funding was provided by the Board of Public Instruction of Volusia County and a grant from the Julius Rosenwald Foundation, which furnished plans and $1,100 to build the four-teacher community school. Associated with what is now Tuskegee University, the Rosenwald program was a major force in rural school design, creating models of positive, orderly, and healthy environments for learning. Herman L. Nordman built the masonry structure with large banks of windows according to “Floor Plan No. 400." This school is one of four Rosenwald Schools built in Volusia County. Historically, the school taught students from first through eighth grade, but the upper grades were discontinued in the 1930s. When black schools in Osteen and Enterprise closed in the early 1950s, those students who could find transportation attended the Orange City School. Side Two: The first principal was William King. Early teachers included Marian L. Coleman, Eva King, Henry J. King, Pauline Poole, Turie Thornton Small, T.E. Thornton, Rosa E. Williams, and Louis King. Marian Coleman was educated in Jacksonville and attended Edward Waters College and Bethune-Cookman College, where she received a Bachelor of Science degree. Her pay in the 1930s amounted to seventy dollars per month, and her appointment as principal in 1943 brought in another ten dollars monthly. In the early 1960s, the Orange City school was renamed the Marian L. Coleman School in her honor. One of the school’s prominent students was Evelyn Wiggins Sharp, who received a Ph.D. from New York University and taught in Volusia County. She was appointed an advisor to the Iranian Ministry of Education for the U.S. State Department in 1960, and worked in Tehran to raise standards of living, literacy, and agricultural practice. When the school closed in 1969, students were transferred to DeLand. The building then served as a community center, recreation facility, and a church. In 1984, it housed the Marian L. Coleman Head Start program. The former school was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.
Sponsors: Volusia County Historic Preservation Board, Village Improvement Association, Orange City Woman's Club
DELEON SPRINGS COLORED SCHOOL
Location:330 East Retta Street
County: Volusia
City: DeLeon Springs
Description: Side One: African American families living in DeLeon Springs in the 1920s needed a better school. The Mt. Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church was no longer adequate and classes moved to St. Joseph Lodge, but it also was too small. In 1928, a group of African American residents, including teacher Carrie Malloy, approached the school board about building a new school. The board rebuffed them, and they turned to school trustee and businessmen Fred N. Burt for help. Burt, a New York native who arrived in DeLeon Springs in 1909, developed the Burwyn Park subdivision, Burt’s Park, and Spring Garden Ranch, which included stables, horse track, and quarters for black laborers. A respected local leader, Burt was a benefactor to the African American community and took up the mission to build the new school. Burt donated the land, financed the construction, and used his own carpenters. Plans for the school house and additional funds were provided by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation, which helped build schools for African Americans all over the south. The school was completed in 1929, and the school board reimbursed Burt half the cost, about $2,000. Side Two: The two-teacher community school faced north as required by the Rosenwald foundation. It taught grades first through eighth. Younger students sat at the front of the classrooms, while older students sat in the rear. Teachers employed between the 1920s and early 1950s included Jamie B. Allen, Carrie L. Malloy, Lou Alyce M. Reddick, Mary Turner Simmons, Eliza H. Staples, Mayo D. Staples, Annetta V. Stokes, Frankye A. Straughter, and Annie May Washington. After World War II, the few high school students who attended were transferred to the Euclid Avenue School in DeLand. The school was renamed the Malloy School in 1955 to honor Carrie Malloy’s early efforts here for black children. Renewed growth compelled the school board to expand the campus in 1954, adding two buildings and a kitchen. Due to the integration of the Volusia County public school system, the school was closed. In 1969. That same year, Doris McWilliams, an educator who had attended the school in the 1940s, started a community center and Head Start Program here. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003 and is one of the few Rosenwald schools left in Florida.
Sponsors: Volusia County Historic Preservation Board, West Volusia Historical Society, Inc., DeLeon Springs Community Association, Inc.
BETHUNE-VOLUSIA BEACH
Location:6656 South Atlantic Avenue
County: Volusia
City: New Smyrna Beach
Description: Side One: When Daytona Beach was founded in 1876 two of its founders, John Tolliver and Thaddeus S. Gooden, were African American. Over the years, Jim Crow laws changed the state drastically, and by the 1920s, African Americans were banned from most of Florida’s public beaches. In response, beaches opened that catered specifically to African Americans like Butler Beach in St. Augustine, American Beach on Amelia Island, and Paradise Park at Silver Springs in Ocala. In 1935, only two places in Volusia County allowed African Americans beach access, and only during the summer and on specific holidays. Bethune-Cookman College co-founder and president Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune wanted to create a beach in Volusia County for African Americans to enjoy without restriction or fear of harassment. Born in Mayesville, South Carolina, to formerly enslaved parents, Bethune moved to Daytona Beach in 1904. She opened the Daytona Literary and Industrial School for the Training of Negro Girls, which later merged with Cookman Institute in Jacksonville to become Bethune-Cookman College. Bethune was an active crusader for educational advancement and civil rights for African Americans in Florida and throughout the nation. Side Two: Bethune approached architect and developer Mr. Dana F. Fuquay about purchasing a two-and-a-half mile strip of land south of New Smyrna Beach. Fuquay owned most of the land along the Intracoastal Waterway in Volusia and Flagler counties. In need of investors, Bethune used her influence to arrange a meeting at the Rogers Hotel in Tampa with some of the wealthiest African Americans in Florida, and on December 9, 1945, the Bethune-Volusia Beach Corporation was formed. The charter members included president, Mr. G.D. Rogers; executive vice-president, Mr. George W. Powell; vice-president, Dr. W.H. Gray; secretary, Mr. James A. Colston; and treasurer, Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune. The new beach quickly became a popular vacation destination for African Americans from all over the country. During the July 4th celebration in 1950, over 5,000 people came out to enjoy the festivities. Bethune-Volusia Beach was open to all races, though ownership of land and businesses was retained solely by African Americans. Following the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the beach lost popularity, and many visitors, particularly those from out of state, stopped coming as other local options became more available.
Sponsors: Volusia County Coastal Division, Bethune Beach Property Owners Association, Bethune Foundation